Autumn Newsletter 2018

Autumn Newsletter 2018

As the Summer months have finished and we have rolled into Autumn, the weather seems to have stayed warm and we are still in desperate need of rain; however, the change of season is often a time to talk abut the parasites that affect our animals

Lice in Cattle

The timing and frequency of treatments depend very much on individual circumstances. In many cases treatment in late autumn or early winter will give adequate control of cattle lice.

Lice irritate cattle, causing the cattle to bite, scratch and rub. The coats of lousy cattle take on a rough scruffy appearance, and, at times, areas of skin are rubbed raw. This will reduce hide value at slaughter and may be inconsistent with on-farm quality assurance programs.

There are two types of cattle lice: biting lice and sucking lice. Biting lice cause severe irritation and sucking lice may cause anaemia in large numbers.

The most common treatments used in cattle are pour-on or injectable anthelmintics. It is important to read the label to ensure that the correct parasites are being treated. It is important to treat all cattle on the property at the same time to reduce the risk of reinfestation. Immediately after treatment move cattle to a paddock that has not had cattle in it for some time.

Parasites in Sheep and Goats

Sheep and goats are very susceptible to barber’s pole worms (Haemonchus contortus) and controlling this parasite is a very important part of small ruminant management.

One of the most important management tools is a worm egg count with the benchmark for a sheep in good body condition being 600-1000 epg.

There are few fixed drenches apart from drenching lambs/kids at weaning and a pre-lambing/kidding drench. Good grazing management and targeted drenching are key components to reducing worm burdens and worm resistance.

Nurse’s corner – vet nurse conference in adelaide

“Shining the Light on Your Future” was the message for the Annual Veterinary Nursing Conference held in Adelaide, South Australia. Stretching over three days, it was jam packed with lectures presented by many guest speakers, and was attended by Hayley and Izzy

For Veterinary Nurses, attending a conference is a very different day from the average working day. Instead of rushing to a beeping fluid pump or answering a phone while mopping up the latest accident- you are rushing to make sure you make it to the next lecture, because the one you were attending ran overtime with information you couldn't help but squeeze into your notebook.

The conference was about sharing knowledge, sharing experiences and developing on the skills they already had. It was about recognising Veterinary Nursing as an occupation and industry- backed with a supportive nursing network and Veterinary Nursing Council.

Over five hundred delegates attended the conference with each day starting at 8:30am and finishing by 5pm. One day in particular started really early, which both tested and educated the attending nurses on nutritional requirements for their patients. Thank goodness for coffee and the supplied breakfast!

Both Izzy and Hayley came back with an exercise book of notes and almost exceeded their checked baggage limits with merchandise to trial in clinic. Throughout the course of the conference, Izzy and Hayley went on separate paths attending different seminars, later regrouping and sharing the main points of each lecture with one another.

During the breaks they attended a trade fair, which represented many veterinary suppliers and nurse educating facilities. Many stalls held daily competitions that put their nursing skills to work, where they competed against nurses from all over Australia. The competitions ranged from the depth of knowledge associated with skincare products to the person who could bandage an entire horse leg from hock to knee, the fastest and neatest. There was even some bandage decorating skills!

Parasites in Small Animals

The humble “flea treatment” controls more than just fleas!

 

 

FLEAS

TICKS

HEARTWORM

Intestinal worms

TAPE

WORM

OTHER

STARTING AGE

ADVANTAGE

Yes 

No 

No

No 

No 

LICE

6 WEEKS OLD

ADVOCATE

Yes 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

MITES

WHIPWORM

7 WEEKS OLD

BRAVECTO

Yes 

Yes 

No 

No 

No 

MANGE

(Demodex + Sarcoptic)

EAR MITES

8 WEEKS OLD

CAPSTAR

Yes 

No 

No 

No 

No 

 

4 WEEKS OLD

COMFORTIS

Yes 

No 

No 

No 

No 

 

14 WEEKS OLD

FRONTLINE

SPRAY

Yes 

Yes 

No 

No 

No 

LICE

MANGE

2 DAYS OLD

NEXGARD

Yes 

Yes 

No 

No 

No 

MANGE

8 WEEKS OLD

NEXGARD

SPECTRA

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

WHIPWORM

8 WEEKS OLD

REVOLUTION

Yes 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

LICE

MITES

6 WEEKS OLD

DRONTAL

No 

No 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

GIARDIA

WHIPWORM

2 WEEKS OLD

FENPRAL

(DOGS)

No 

No 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

WHIPWORM

2 WEEKS OLD

FENPRAL

(CATS)

No 

No 

No 

Yes 

No 

 

6 WEEKS OLD

MILBEMAX

No 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

WHIPWORM

2 WEEKS OLD

POPANTEL

No 

No 

No 

No 

Yes 

 

2 WEEKS OLD

PROFENDER

No 

No 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

LUNGWORM

8 WEEKS